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landmark school's six teaching principles

Six Teaching Principles: #6 Include Students in the Learning Process

Blog Type:  Teaching Date Posted:  Tuesday, May 25, 2021

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Definition

Students are not passive receptacles to fill with information. They come to class with their own frames of reference.

Their unique experiences and knowledge affect them as learners and should be taken into account. Therefore, during every exercise, teachers should accept student input as much as possible. Teachers should justify assignments, accept suggestions, solicit ideas, and provide ample time for students to share ideas. They should include students in assessing their own progress by reviewing test results, written reports, and educational plans. Creating and improvising opportunities to involve students in the learning process allows students to become aware of how they learn and why certain skills benefit them. As a result, students are motivated and more likely to apply those skills when working independently. In short, an included student becomes an invested student who is eager to learn.

In Practice

“Setting goals has proven to be a successful way to get students to buy into academic tasks, reduce complaints, and encourage progress.” —Deb Chandler, academic advisor, Elementary•Middle School
“In our ongoing quest to foster healthy decision making and destigmatize conversations around mental health, we invite students to co-lead discussion groups and to serve as ambassadors to the larger school community.”  —Dan Larson, counselor, High School

example of landmark school teaching principle #6 Include Students in the Learning Process

take a look at Landmark's other Teaching Principles

#1 Provide Opportunities for Success

#2 Use Multisensory Approaches

#3 Micro-Unit and Structure Tasks

#4 Ensure Automatization Through Practice and Review

#5 Provide Models

 

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Six Teaching Principles: #5 Provide Models

Blog Type:  Teaching Date Posted:  Tuesday, May 25, 2021

Definition

Providing models is simple, yet very important. It is one of the most effective teaching techniques.

Models are concrete examples of what teachers expect. They do not mean that teachers are doing assignments for students. They are standards to which students can compare their own work. A model or an example of a completed assignment serves as a springboard for students to begin the assignment. For example, teachers should give students a model of a sequential paragraph when teaching basic sequential paragraph writing.

In Practice

“In our Early Childhood Education class, we asked students to create children’s books explaining ‘how babies are made.’ We read them a few examples to provide visual and oral structure, and then gave them blank, hardcover books. The assignment provided students with an opportunity to be creative and explain a complicated process using simple language. Their final products were terrific!” —Ariel Martin-Cone, High School academic dean

explanation of landmark schools fifth teaching principle: modeling

take a look at Landmark's other Teaching Principles

#1 Provide Opportunities for Success

#2 Use Multisensory Approaches

#3 Micro-Unit and Structure Tasks

#4 Ensure Automatization Through Practice and Review

#6 Include Students in the Learning Process

more teaching posts

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Tags:  modeling in the classroom landmark school's six teaching principles

Six Teaching Principles: #4 Ensure Automatization Through Practice and Review

Blog Type:  Teaching Date Posted:  Tuesday, May 25, 2021

boy jumping on chalk squares with numbers

Definition

Automatization is the process of learning and assimilating a task or skill so completely that it can be consistently completed with little or no conscious attention.

Repetition and review (spiraling) are critical. Sometimes students appear to understand a concept, only to forget it a day, week, or month later. It is not until students have automatized a skill that they can effectively remember and use it as a foundation for new tasks. Teachers must therefore provide ample opportunities for students to repeat and review learned material. For example, the Landmark writing process emphasizes practice and consistency. Students always brainstorm, map/outline, draft, and proofread in the same way. This provides them with an ongoing, consistent review of learned skills. 

In Practice

“In language arts we use card-sorting and Go-Fish games daily and weekly to practice different parts of speech and grammar rules. This strategy utilizes several of Landmark’s Teaching Principles. It’s multimodal (#2), helps micro-unit the information (#3), and supports students’ practice and review (#4). Students are also forced to “figure it out,” which gets them to move beyond learned helplessness without even realizing it, because they are having fun!” —Kaleigh Mangiarelli, High School faculty

take a look at Landmark's other Teaching Principles

#1 Provide Opportunities for Success

#2 Use Multisensory Approaches

#3 Micro-Unit and Structure Tasks

#5 Provide Models

#6 Include Students in the Learning Process

more teaching posts

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Tags:  landmark school's six teaching principles Automatization

Six Teaching Principles: #2 Use Multisensory Approaches

Blog Type:  Teaching Date Posted:  Monday, May 24, 2021

chris woodin teaching hands-on math lesson

Definition

Multisensory teaching is effective for all students. In general, it means presenting all information to students via three sensory modalities: visual, auditory, and tactile.

Visual presentation techniques include graphic organizers for structuring writing and pictures for reinforcing instruction; auditory presentation techniques include conducting thorough discussions and reading aloud; and tactile presentation techniques include manipulating blocks and creating paragraphs about objects students can hold in their hands. Overall, implementing a multisensory approach to teaching is not difficult; in fact, many teachers use such an approach. It is important, however, to be aware of the three sensory modes and to plan to integrate them every day.

In Practice

“We recently talked about physics (motion, momentum, speed, velocity, Newton’s Laws, etc.) in my physical science class. I had my classes participate in a roller coaster competition, in which they built roller coasters out of paper and tape to get a marble around a loop, over a hill, and around two turns, based on their knowledge of the physics concepts that we had talked and written about. Using multiple modalities allowed students to see the concepts come to life, and they were engaged and interested. Students were also engaging in teamwork, accessing their long-term project planning skills, and utilizing vocabulary in context.” —Michelle Boucher, High School faculty

landmark school teaching principle #2 illustrated

take a look at Landmark's other Teaching Principles

#1 Provide Opportunities for Success

#3 Micro-Unit and Structure Tasks

#4 Ensure Automatization Through Practice and Review

#5 Provide Models

#6 Include Students in the Learning Process

more teaching posts

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Six Teaching Principles: #1 Provide Opportunities for Success

Blog Type:  Teaching Date Posted:  Thursday, March 25, 2021

landmark high school student advocates presentation

Definition

Providing students with opportunities for success is key. Failure and poor self-esteem often result when teachers challenge students beyond their ability.

Landmark begins teaching students at their current level of ability. This approach improves basic skills and enhances confidence. As Landmark teachers introduce each new skill, they provide basic examples and assignments to build confidence and keep students from becoming overwhelmed. As the information becomes more challenging, teachers assign students easier problems to supplement the more difficult ones. In this way, those students who are having trouble with the material complete at least part of the assignment while they work at understanding and learning to apply new information. Teachers provide students with whatever structure is necessary to help students be successful, such as study guides for tests, templates for writing, and guidelines for projects. Only with a solid foundation of basic skills and confidence can students make progress. That is why it is key to provide them with opportunities for success.

NOTE: Providing opportunities for success is the most basic of the building blocks of the Landmark approach. If the other five principles are applied effectively they should all lead to the student experiencing and being aware of their success. 

In Practice

“Academic advisors use goal sheets to help students make positive decisions. This allows teachers to provide constructive and positive feedback in person and on the goal sheet. They also allow the student, teacher, advisor, and parents to be informed of the patterns of behavior and the goal(s) that the student is working toward.” —Geoff Russell, EMS academic advisor

example of landmark school teaching principle #1

take a look at Landmark's other Teaching Principles

#2 Use Multisensory Approaches

#3 Micro-Unit and Structure Tasks

#4 Ensure Automatization Through Practice and Review

#5 Provide Models

#6 Include Students in the Learning Process

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Tags:  landmark school's six teaching principles opportunity for success scaffolding feedback

Landmark's Six Teaching Principles

Blog Type:  Teaching Date Posted:  Thursday, March 25, 2021

By Rob Kahn

landmark high school steam lab

Many professional visitors to Landmark wrap up their visits by observing: “It’s really remarkable to see the same materials and methods used by teachers in many different classes.” That’s no accident. Visualize Landmark as an inverted pyramid. The pyramid’s wide base is 475 students and 250 teachers in hundreds of classes going about their business each day. Below the surface, the pyramid’s base narrows to an underlying point. Despite widely different experiences and individualized classes, all teaching at Landmark tapers to that origin point of Six Teaching Principles™ that have existed since the school began. These core principles inform the school’s deep-rooted philosophy. Their influence and expression are what visitors perceive, whether they visit a second grade or 12th grade classroom, a study hall, a dorm, or a sports venue at Landmark.

Visionary Founder Led By Example

The Six Teaching Principles™ are the result of reflection and mentoring by a dyslexic student who became a teacher. Charles Drake thought about what did and did not work for him and others like him and formulated a practice. First, don’t repeat the errors of traditional teaching when confronted with diverse minds. Let students experience success, not repeated failures, so they build confidence and resilience while acquiring language skills. Successful interactions are key to establishing trust and motivation.

Second, recognize that traditional teaching—text-based and lecture-oriented—is adequate for some learners but leaves out others. Teach through multiple senses—vision, hearing, movement, and touch—to reinforce brain connections. Learning can take many forms, and more paths to the desired end maximize reinforcement.

Next, beware of paths where increments are out of sequence, oversized, or poorly paced. A success-oriented teacher should have a clear chain of micro-units, each building logically from those preceding, so that students are inevitably led to the goal. Realize that skills must be reinforced until they are habits, the result of hours of practice and review. Automatized learning is learning at the deepest level, a level that relieves the strain on working memory because the response is ingrained. That review and practice must be meaningful, based on models for the desired result that guide students to produce successful outcomes.

Finally, give respect and credit to your students by partnering with them in the endeavor of learning. This principle fosters self-advocacy, perhaps the most often-cited tool, along with reading proficiency, that students take as their legacy from Landmark.

Why have these six principles endured for 50 years at Landmark? They are essentially a recipe for the population, mission, and secret to Landmark. They are logical, sequenced, and comprehensive. Recognize that all students aren’t served well by one way of teaching, and that a history of school failure has terrible consequences for individuals and society as a whole. Reclaim education for all learners by meeting students where they are and looking for ways that all can learn. Finally, recognize that diverse learners have gifts and talents to offer, in their personal learning process and for the world at large. What Landmark provides is the confidence and tools to move forward and unlock their potential.

Learn more about each teaching principle, see examples of each, and find tips on how to implement them in your classroom.

#1 Provide Opportunities for Success

#2 Use Multisensory Approaches

#3 Micro-Unit and Structure Tasks

#4 Ensure Automatization Through Practice and Review

#5 Provide Models

#6 Include Students in the Learning Process

Tags:  landmark school's six teaching principles dyslexia charles drake Landmark School
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